So you want to take the kids to the Louvre, eh?

“Maybe we should just go get dinner instead…”

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photo: www.louvre.fr

I sighed watching an endless line snake around the Louvre’s famed glass pyramid. The kids shuffled their feet, exhausted after a long, hot day absorbing a city that overwhelmed their young senses. Tourists clattered.  The sounds of a distant cello echoed from underneath a stone entry. Cigarette smoke carried laughter through the air. Feeling depleted, I felt my enthusiasm wane.  I just wanted some water, shade and somewhere cool to sit. But thankfully my husband, stubborn and sweet, persevered.  “We’re here.  We can do this.  Only if it’s we spend a few minutes inside, let’s at least try.” He was right.  This was our chance to bring the kids to the Louvre and rely on the pre-planning and research we did to make this moment work.

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For as many things as our family fumbles through while traveling, visiting the Louvre is one thing I feel like we got right.   A little strategizing and planning made our visit to the Louvre in August with kids, stress free. To be perfectly honest, I was completely (and pleasantly) shocked.

What made it work?

1. Paris Museum Pass. Our strategy started with the purchase of four Paris Museum Passes. If you are not familiar with the Paris Museum Pass, they are worth their weight in gold especially if you are traveling with kids.  You pay once for a 2, 4, or 6 day pass and have access to a myriad of Paris’s top spots (including the Louvre, Rodin, Arc d’Triomphe, Pompidou and more).  By using the pass we eliminated the pressure and cost of buying four individual tickets at each sight which, as a result, eliminated the need to make a general admission fee “pay-off”. We didn’t feel the pressure to spend max-time at any given spot and knew we could come and go as we pleased.

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http://en.parismuseumpass.com/

But that is not the best part.  The greatest perk of having Museum Passes at the Louvre is that you skip the general entry line.  There is a separate (and when we were there – empty) entry line for Museum Pass holders. We strolled right past that  long, snaking line in front of the glass pyramid and walked right onto the escalator down to the lobby. Right then and there the Museum Pass paid for itself!  It was like having a FastPass at Disney!  Best. Thing. Ever.

2. Go late.  The Louvre is open late on Wednesdays and Fridays.  The last entry is at 10pm. We arrived at 8 and although it was late, the crowds and mammoth tour groups had waned.  We were grateful. The absence of tour groups was apparent when viewing famed works like the Mona Lisa. Don’t get me wrong, it was still crowded, but not enough that our kids couldn’t get a front row, close-up look at the famous smirking lady.  The lighter crowds were manageable.

And because the crowds are lighter, the Louvre lets artists set up in the main halls to paint under the canopy of the world’s greatest masterpieces.  Our kids were witness to some amazing art; past, present and future.  It was pretty incredible.

3. Know what you want to see.  We planned for three scenarios: must see, would like to see, and will see if the kids haven’t crashed yet. Of course the Mona Lisa which is housed in the Denon Wing was the primary piece we wanted the kids to see.  Most of the other pieces we chose were also in the Denon Wing, and we knew that keeping our visit isolated to one wing was probably the best idea for our family.  The Louvre is vast and paring our visit down helped tremendously.

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4. Read ahead.  Give your kids an idea of the pieces they will see before you visit.  This helped because we didn’t have to spend our limited time getting them up to speed on what they were seeing.  It gave us the opportunity to revisit the work and talk about things we already discussed. We could prompt them with a few, “remember when we talked about XYZ?” It piqued their curiosity, and they asked a few questions but we didn’t feel the need to recite a diatribe about the who, what, where, and when of each piece.  Our reading let us sit back and enjoy what we saw.

5. What we forgot to do?  Study the Louvre map for exits and bathrooms!  It sounds so basic.  This was the only “ugh!” of our time there.  We got caught up in the artwork and the crowds and before we knew it, we were stuck in the Egyptian section and couldn’t find a fast route out.  We all had to use a bathroom.  We were all ready to go.  I checked our map, but every “Sortie” only led to more tunnels and corridors. Next time we visit, I will study the map like a HAWK.

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theotherparis.net

As with any trip (with or without kids), a little planning goes a long way and the Louvre is certainly a testament to that.

Do you have any tips to share? Please do in the comments below!

 

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